Skip to content

Children

A Changing World: New England in the Photographs of Verner Reed, 1950-1972

Children

Reed was especially interested in children. Time and again, he used his camera to explore the subject of young people and the changing customs they represent. We are allowed to relish the innocence of their lives, but also to search their faces for clues as to how they will run the world when their turn comes. Like canaries in a coal mine, Reed's images of children sometimes hint at the self-confidence and readiness for change that would come to characterize this generation.

null

Halloween, Stowe, Vermont, 1951

null

Boy with Attitude, Barton, Vermont, 1952

This young man takes a quick break from enjoying a traditional New England treat--maple syrup poured over snow--to address the photographer with self-possession seemingly beyond his years.

null

Saturday Afternoon, Stowe, Vermont, 1952

null

Fourth of July, North Danville, Vermont, 1952

null

Boy with Potato Sack, East Whately, Massachusetts, 1954

null

Christmas Reflections, Boston, 1955

null

Washington Street, Boston, 1955

null

Moving Day, Pease Air Force Base, Portsmouth, New Hampshire, 1956

Reed shot this image for Life to illustrate a story on how the Air Force aids the families of its personnel. While documenting the relocation of a family, his eye was caught by this young boy on a tricycle making lazy circles around the gas station next door. The image captures perfectly the sense of transition--a country on the move--that pervades so much of Reed's work.

null

In Search of Snow, Stowe, Vermont, 1964

 

A Changing World: New England in the Photographs of Verner Reed, 1950-1972 

Organized by Historic New England, Boston, Massachusetts 

All photographs are drawn from the collections of Historic New England, presented by the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities. They are part of the Verner Reed Archive, a collection of more than 26,000 negatives and prints, which was donated by Verner and Deborah Reed. 

John R. Stomberg served as guest curator of the original exhibition.


 

Children