Water Pitcher

Collection Type

  • Decorative arts

Date

ca. 1820

GUSN

GUSN-5894

Description

Colorless blown and cut circuloid globular body rising from flat base, indented slightly at cylindrical neck with scalloped mouth forming a spout; cut decoration with fluted lower third of body and central diamond cut band surmounted by square facet cuts; lozenge facet cuts at neck; applied strap handle with ovoid cut along edge.

Details

Descriptive Terms

pitchers (vessels)
glassblowing
cutting (dividing)
lead glass
glass (material)
Glass
Blown
Cut
PITCHER, WATER

Label

"Cherished Possessions": These cut glass pitchers belonged to Portsmouth, New Hampshire, merchant James Rundlet. They were most likely used for water, placed on the table throughout the meal. In The House Servant's Directory (1827), Robert Roberts recommended placing “four or six water decanters or cut glass pitchers, on your supper table, as the company generally help themselves at supper without the formality of more attendance than is necessary for comfort.”

Associated Building

Original to Rundlet-May House (Portsmouth, N.H.),

Maker

Unknown

Location of Origin

Ireland

Object Type

Food Service T&E

Credit Line

Gift of Ralph May

Accession Number

1971.986.1