Perspective drawing of an unidentified house by L.E. Jallade & A. J. Mckenna, July 1st, ca. 1928

Collection Type

  • Architecture

Date

ca. 1928

GUSN

GUSN-310216

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Description

This graphite, perspective drawing features an unidentified house with a thatched shingle roof and two chimneys. It also depicts many gables with dormers, as well as facades. Large trees resembling weeping willows are on either side of the house. Green colored pencil gently shades in the trees and areas of the lawn.

Details

Descriptive Terms

one-point perspectives (perspective views)
gables (architectural elements)
dormers
chimneys (architectural elements)
windows
trees
false thatched roofs
one-point perspectives (perspective views)

Physical Description

1 perspective; graphite on paper; 20 X 12 in.

Collection Code

AR001

Collection Name

General architectural and cartographic collection

Reference Code

AR001.UNK.030

Acquisition Type

Gift

Credit Line

Gifted by Christopher Monkhouse.

Record Details

Originator

Jallade, Louis E. (Louis Eugene), 1876-1957 (Architect)
Mckenna, A. J.

Material Type

one-point perspectives (perspective views)

Other People

Jallade, Louis E. (Louis Eugene), 1876-1957
Mckenna, A. J.

Subjects

Architecture

Description Level

Item

Historical/Biographical Note

Historical/Biographical Note

Louis Eugene (L.E.) Jallade (1876-1957) was a Canadian-born architect who recieved his education in both New York City and Paris. After attending the famous Ecole des Beaux Arts from 1901-1903, he worked in New York City and Boston both independantly and in conjunction with Paul E. DuBoy and [Frederick R.] Allen & [Chalres] Collens. Some of his most prominent works are the Thomson Meter Co. Building (New York), the Ansonia Hotel (New York), and the Naval YMCA building in Norfolk, VA, which was his first independant commission (1906-1908). Jallade was stylistically conservative and designed mostly in the style of Hennebique concrete system, a reinforced concrete system pioneered by architect Francois Hennebique (1842-1921).