The American country club :its origins and development /James M. Mayo.

Collection Type

  • Books and periodicals

GUSN

GUSN-254559

Description

x, 243 p. : ill. ; 24 cm., The American country club movement parallels the rise of suburbanization in the United States. Its roots can be found in the exclusive city clubs and summer resorts of the nineteenth century; its growth reflects a desire for permanent and organized places where the wealthy could spend their free time. By the late nineteenth century, mass transportation enabled the wealthy to escape the confines of the city, and suburbanization began. Their pursuit of pleasure--in the form of city clubs, spas, summer resorts, and sophisticated sports--became the impetus for the country club, a place where the elite could combine their interests in sports, the outdoors, and relaxation while separating themselves from the masses. This book chronicles the social and economic evolution of this leisure landscape. Some critics feel that the country club represents a basic liberty of social choice whereas others view it as an unnecessary source of social discrimination.--From publisher description.

Details

Descriptive Terms

Country clubs History.
Clubs.
Country club
Geschichte.

Originator

Mayo, James M.

Publication

New Brunswick, NJ : Rutgers University Press

Description

x, 243 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
The American country club movement parallels the rise of suburbanization in the United States. Its roots can be found in the exclusive city clubs and summer resorts of the nineteenth century; its growth reflects a desire for permanent and organized places where the wealthy could spend their free time. By the late nineteenth century, mass transportation enabled the wealthy to escape the confines of the city, and suburbanization began. Their pursuit of pleasure--in the form of city clubs, spas, summer resorts, and sophisticated sports--became the impetus for the country club, a place where the elite could combine their interests in sports, the outdoors, and relaxation while separating themselves from the masses. This book chronicles the social and economic evolution of this leisure landscape. Some critics feel that the country club represents a basic liberty of social choice whereas others view it as an unnecessary source of social discrimination.--From publisher description.

Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 209-233) and index.
Gift of the Vernacular Architecture Project, January 30, 2002.

ISBN

0813524857
9780813524856

Call Number

Stacks HS2723.M39 1998

Places

United States
USA