Skip to content

Home > Events and Programs > Past Events > 100 Years, 100 Communities > From Clam Flats to Clam Shacks: Clamming on Massachusetts' North Shore

From Clam Flats to Clam Shacks: Clamming on Massachusetts' North Shore

Oh What an Appetite One Gets Here
Courtesy of Joseph Carlin.
 

Visitors to Massachusetts' North Shore may lounge on sandy beaches, browse antiques shops, or learn about nineteenth-century shipbuilding. But few of them will go home without making a key stop for a dish of clams.

Gathered from mud flats during low tide using a simple fork and a basket, the clam has long been called "humble," "unobtrusive," and "modest." Yet over the course of the last century this mollusk has become the very basis for the identity of communities along the North Shore. Whether they eat, dig, cook, or sell clams, or operate businesses that benefit from the presence of clam-seeking tourists, just about everyone living here is affected by this industry. The humble clam tells a mighty story.

The online exhibition From Clam Flats to Clam Shacks: Clamming on Massachusetts' North Shore explores the development of this industry and its part in local culture, local economies, and the Great Marsh ecosystem.

View the exhibition.

For more information, e-mail community engagement at Historic New England.

Partners:

From Clam Flats to Clam Shacks: Clamming on Massachusetts' North Shore