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Post-war Prosperity

A KITCHEN OF THE 50s
Milkmen delivered to the kitchen, where milk products were stored, prepared, and served to the family. Advertising and media images of the modern kitchen illustrated processed foods, power appliances, and the latest in kitchen design and materials.
 
After World War II, change came to the milkman. The milkman was a familiar character in the neighborhoods of small towns and cities alike, and dairy products now held an unquestioned place in the American diet. Yet, refrigerators, supermarkets, suburban sprawl, and automobiles threatened home delivery. Consumers chose to live in different places and get milk in different ways. In fact, by the end of the 1950s, home delivery fell into a decline and never recovered. By the early 1950s, reliable power refrigeration replaced ice boxes and revised the homemaker’s job of buying and cooking for the household. Perishable foods like milk could now be bought in greater quantity and kept longer without spoiling, more meals could be made from leftovers, and frozen foods could replace fresh. The milkman did not have to arrive every day in order for the family to have unsoured milk.
 
Milkmen and dairies sought to please women as the buyers and cooks of family food.
Advertisement for the General Electric Refrigerator
From McCall’s, April 1952
Advertisement for the Westinghouse Refrigerator

From Good Housekeeping, April 1940

 

Post-war Prosperity