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Milk for Health

 
MILK FOR HEALTH
Once the public could buy clean, disease-free milk,mass advertising associated milk products with public health and well-being. At the same time, advertising and sales promotions changed the character of modern packaging, making it more than just a container for preservation and transport. Companies aimed their promotional items
 
primarily at women as the chief purchasers and at children as the main consumers of milk products. The advice to drink milk for health and strength appeared in cookbooks, in magazines, and on posters, but not everyone agreed:
 
“It seems strange to one not intellectually soaked in milk propaganda that whole races can live and thrive and acquire strength and endurance without ever touching a drop of milk, or without using any other products of dairy animals.”
—F. J. Schlink,
Eat, Drink, and Be Wary, 1935
 

Poster published by H. P. Hood and Sons, 1950s (above, left)
Courtesy of the Society for the
Preservation of New England Antiquities
Quart milk carton, 1950s (background)
Advertisement for Real Butter (far left)

H. P. Hood and Sons, Boston
Courtesy of the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities

Flier for Ray’s Dairy, Saxtons River, Vermont, advertising square bottles, 1950s (left)
Courtesy of Maureen Glasier

 

 

Milk for Health