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Boston Harbor from Mr. Greene's House, Pemberton Hill

1927.430 (RS848)

Description

View of Boston harbor, large cupola at right, US flag left, row of buildings leading to water.

Details

Label
"Cherished Possessions": Within a few months of his arrival in Boston, Massachusetts, the English-trained painter Robert Salmon commenced this enormous painting. According to his journal, he began it on March 1, 1829, worked for forty-two days, and completed it on April 12. The gigantic panorama was the centerpiece of an exhibition he assembled in November 1829 with the aim of establishing himself as the finest artist in his newly adopted city. The scene depicts a thriving maritime and commercial city containing some of the finest buildings in the country. Boston, at that time the nation's fourth largest city, was renowned for its beautiful architecture. Six years later, Greene's house, which Salmon had used as his vantage point, was demolished, and the earth at the top of Pemberton Hill was shaved off, carted away, and used to make new land in the city's Back Bay.
Maker
Salmon, Robert, 1775 (Artist)
Date
1829
Location of origin
Boston, MA, USA
Material
canvas
tempera
Object type
Art
Places
Boston (Suffolk county, Massachusetts)
Massachusetts (United States)
Descriptive terms
canvas
Coated Canvas
landscapes (representations)
Painting
paintings (visual works)
tempera
Tempera
People and organizations
Boston Harbor
Dimensions
100 x 183 (HxW) (inches)
Accession Number
1927.430
Credit Line
Museum Purchase
GUSN
55110

Comments

Painting: Robert Salmon's "View of Boston from Pemberton Hill" #

AvatarPosted by Bob Pomeroy on October 30, 2015
Does anyone know where this painting is now? It used to be in the lobby of One Boston Place (201 Washington) but it left when the lobby was redone a few years ago.

We have a poster up in our office about it. It's a HUGE painting.

Robert Salmon painting #

AvatarPosted by Nicole Chalfant - Collection Manager on November 9, 2015
Thank you for your comment, Mr. Pomeroy.
You are absolutely correct about the size of this wonderful painting. It is a little over fifteen feet long. Because of its size and the challenges of displaying it, the painting is currently housed in art storage. I'm so glad to hear that you have a copy of it on your office wall.
Sincerely,
Nicole Chalfant
Collection Manager