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1919.140AB (RS241434)

Description

Pair of silk shoes with a two inch heels, oval toe, square tongue, and a floral design.

Details

Label
Walk Right In 11/98-3/99 Many eighteenth-century shoes are called buckle shoes because a removable metal buckle was used to fasten the straps along the top. The high heel, round toe, angled side seams, and exhuberant floral pattern of this buckle shoe are characteristic of shoes made in the third quarter of the eighteenth century.
"Cherished Possessions": In eighteenth-century Boston, Massachusetts, the latest London fashions were readily available to those who could afford them. These brocade shoes were made in the section of London called Cheapside, known for its textile merchants and shoemakers. Like most shoes of the period, they have no right or left but were made to be interchangeable. The long tabs were intended to be fastened by buckles, which were worn like jewelry and could be transferred from one pair of shoes to another. Buckles could be set with diamonds for the wealthiest wearers, or, like these, made of paste. The original owner of these buckles, Prudence Jenkins, wore them at her wedding in 1778.<br/>
Maker
Jonathan Hose and Son (Maker)
Date
1770
Location of origin
London, England
Material
brocade (textile)
silk (textile)
stitching
Object type
Clothing; Footwear
Places
London (Greater London, England, United Kingdom)
Descriptive terms
brocade (textile)
Shoe
shoes (footwear)
silk (textile)
stitching
Dimensions
4 3/4 x 2 3/4 (HxW) (inches)
Accession Number
1919.140AB
Credit Line
Gift of Miss Mary C. Wheelwright
GUSN
3400

Comments

Jonathan Hose #

AvatarPosted by Colin Hose on February 13, 2015
Assume the above article about Johnathan Hose is maybe John Hose of Cheapside later in Lombatd St, London, what are your thoughts.
Best Wishes
Colin Hose
(Great Grandson x7)

Hose shoes #

AvatarPosted by Kimberly Alexander on April 17, 2015
Yes, Colin, they are indeed! The stunning shoes are currently on view at "Cosmopolitan Consumption: New England Shoe Stories, 1750-1850" through 5 June 2015 at the Portsmouth Athenaeum, Portsmouth, NH.