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Women's riding jacket

2006.44.1336.1 (RS12171)


Black wool women's riding habit jacket. The jacket is well-tailored and has a high stand-up collar with a decorative ribbon border around the edge. The collar has two hooks and eyes along the opening. The opening of the bodice has fifteen black buttons. Each side of the bodice has two darts which are reinforced with boning running from below the breast to the bottom seam and them comes to a point on both sides of the closure. The sleeves have a slight puff at the shoulders and have a bend at the elbow. There are three buttons at the bottom of the sleeve. And there is a double line of stitching to form a cuff that then runs up above the buttons. The inside is lined with taupe cotton and has a loop sewn in at the neckline. There is a sewn in belt at the waist made of thick taupe ribbon. It is attached at the back and has a label stitched into the belt which reads “L.P. Hollander & Co. Boston.” There are two hooks and eyes at the end of the belt. On the lower left corner there is a piece of the taupe lining material sewn on that contains a button hole. Along the bottom edge of the lining there are two vertical button holes on either side of the back sewn into black fabric. Directly in the middle of the back on the inside are two vertical button holes sewn into the same rectangular piece of black fabric. The back of the bodice has two seams on either side of the central seam running form top to bottom. The bottom of the jacket sweets down to a short rectangular tail that has three vertical pleats on it topped by two decorative buttons on the right and left pleat. \n


L.P. Hollander & Co. (Maker)
"L.P. Hollander & Co. Boston" (Sewn in label.)
Location of origin
Boston, Massachusetts
Associated Building
Original to Phillips House (Salem, Mass.).
Object type
Clothing -- Outerwear
Boston (Suffolk county, Massachusetts)
Massachusetts (United States)
Descriptive terms
jackets (garments)
riding habits
11 13/16 (W) (inches)
Accession Number
Credit Line
Gift of the Stephen Phillips Memorial Charitable Trust for Historic Preservation